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  • in reply to: May: Spring Camporee Registration #3582

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    Registration form and camp information pack with schedule can be found here

    https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B_1Swilf59Snd2llYVV4MTlnNXM/edit

    in reply to: Murphy’s Point / Narrows Lock #3050

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    Paul, was this the Narrow’s Lock Campground where you stayed?
    http://www.campscout.com/campground/ON0122/

    in reply to: SCOUTS CANADA: GAMSOCS – COLONY CRAFT ACTIVITIES #2021

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    Other remembrance day artifacts that have been useful to reference or use:

    in reply to: CHIEF SCOUT BACKGROUND INFORMATION AND PRESENTATIONS #2019

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    1st STITTSVILLE SCOUTS

    Voyageur Personal Development Requirement #14 and #16 (Physical)

    Welcome to the 1st Stittsville Scout Group Chief Scout program resource forum. Over the past few years our 1st Stittsville Scout sections have been developing program activities that are intended to address the requirements for the Chief Chief Scout Award.

    The information presented in this forum are ideas that have been run by our Troop sections as well as ideas that have been collected from other scout groups within Canada.

    The Chief Scout Award is the highest award that scout aged youth can earn across Canada and brings National Level recognition to the youth. This URL provides a small background to the Chief Scout Award http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chief_Scout%27s_Award

    Please feel free to download these program ideas for your own use.

    If you have other program ideas for this requirement that you would like to share, please email scouterpyd@rogers.com and they will be published at this forum.

    **NOTE**
    Our Troop decided to handle the Personal Development Physical Requirement #14 and #16 at the same time. The information that is posted on this forum reflects that choice. Your Troop may do something different

    in reply to: Apple Hill – Alexandria, ON #2017

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    Updated

    in reply to: Camp Opemikon – Perth, ON #2016

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    Updated

    in reply to: OUTDOOR SKILLS WORKSHOP: AXE AND SAW SAFETY PERMIT #2001

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    “pydavies” wrote:

    AXE and SAW SAFETY PERMIT PINThe material attached to this web posting contain three workshop activities for Axes, Hatchets and Saws. The goal of these workshops is to provide essential instruction on how to use these items safely in the outdoor environment.

    The workshops should be conducted in the following manner:

    1. Presentation is to be conducted in an outside environment
    2. Teacher provides instruction to student
    3. Students pass the workshop via
          3 a) Verbally discussing safe use of axes, hatchets and saws
          3 b) Successfully demonstrates safe use of axes, hatchets and saws

    On completion of the workshop, the scout leader will be eligible to wear the Axe and Saw Permit Pin

    PROGRAM UPDATES.
    Updated: April 20tth 2010:
    ZIP File added. The ZIP file contains updated comments and recommendations based on 6 pilot programs run by Scout leaders.
    Download the ZIP file and open it to view the most recent workshop guidelines.

    NOTE: Oct 14th 2009
    Oct 14th 2009:
    There have been 112 downloads of earlier versions.

    SPECIAL RECOMMENDATION
    Only Scout leaders who have gained the “Axe and Saw” Permit Pin should be allowed to teach Scout youth how to use Axes, hatchets and saws.

    ADOBE READER FOR PDF FILES
    You will require Adobe PDF reader to look at these files. Follow this link to download Adobe Reader. http://get.adobe.com/reader/

    File Description
    Axe Permit Final WORKSHOP: This file provides instructions on (a) Differences between axes and hatchets (b) Setup of safe chopping area (c) Safety precautions when using an axe (d) Chopping positions and cutting angles (e) Three chopping methods (Limbing/Bucking/Splitting) (f) safe storage of an axe (g) Passing an axe (h) Care of an axe and (i) Permit demonstration requirements

    Hatchet Permit Final WORKSHOP: This file provides instructions on (a) What you would use hatchets for (b) Setup of safe chopping area (c) Safety precautions when using a hatchet (d) Chopping position for wood and kindling (e) Passing a hatchet (f) Care of a hatchet and (g) Permit demonstration requirements

    Saw Permit Final WORKSHOP: This file provides instructions on (a) Common saws used in Scouting (b) Transporting Saws (c) Safe Saw assembly (d) Safety precautions when using a saw (e) Kerf, Teeth and Pitch (f) Care of a saw and (i) Permit demonstration requirements

    Tool ComparisonThis file presents a comparison of the advantages and disadvantages of axes, hatchets and saws when taking them into the outdoors and applications that you can use them for.

    in reply to: Cooking in cardboard #2007

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    Beautiful David, thanks for sharing. That’s very cool indeed……or should I say HOT.

    Cheers,

    in reply to: OUTDOOR SKILLS WORKSHOP: KNIFE SAFETY PERMIT #2003

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    Al,

    Good point – I know FRED as that is what I was taught. What do you think is the most applicable term taught to the kids nowadays. We should stick with what the kids are familiar with.

    I can easily drum up a similar page with the PRICE acronym and have both FRED and PRICE so the presenter has options depending on the audience.

    Paul Y.D

    in reply to: OUTDOOR SKILLS WORKSHOP: KNIFE SAFETY PERMIT #2002

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    In the ski patrol, rather than using the acronym ‘FRED’ (as you do in the 10 commandments for the knife permit), we typically use "PRICE"… Standing for
    "P" – Prevention
    "R" – Rest
    "I" – Ice
    "C" – Compression
    "E" – Elevation

    Of course prevention is the most important aspect of this; unfortunately in most first aid situations, the injured person as already blown the "P" and you’re down to "RICE". Compression is then your best bet to stem the flow and to prevent the onset of shock (and to reduce the risk of infection).

    Al

    in reply to: Basic Winter Camping Skills #1999

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    Thanks David,

    This is some great information that can be used again and again for both Cubs and Scouts. Thanks a million for posting it. I’m sure others will benefit from it as well.

    Cheers,

    in reply to: 2008 Stittsville Villagefest REPORT #1998

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    1ye23l3h]Each year our youth participate on this day to help raise funds for the Stittsville Food Bank. This year was no exception. The Stittsville Scouts handed out apples for voluntary donations as a means to provide support the local food bank. 1ye23l3h]

    Our Beaver Colonies worked areas such as the IDA, Mahogany Spa, Giant Tiger, and Browns, while our Cub Packs worked McDonalds, GRC, Stittsville Arena, and the Legion Hall.

    We’d like to thank the community for all their generous donations during this time. The Food Bank will definately benefit from all the funds raised during this event, which will make our community an even better one.

    Our Scout Groups participated in a little bit of a different capacity, working the Abbot Street Park for the many Villagefest activities that were taking place.

    Scouts met at the Fire Pit arount 10:00am and were put to work right away, getting things prepared for the day, setting up the Canteen, starting the fire, erecting some tents, and building some games for the many people who were planned to stop by on the day.

    The Scouts Canteen consisted of items such as Corn on the Cob, Apple Juice, Apples of course, cookies, Marshmallow roasting, and of Hot Apple Cider, which was a big hit. Scouts took turns manning the games and canteen stations and of course participated themsevles in some of the events. There was even a wagon ride on a little stretch of the Trans-Canada Trail, which many visitors and our youth took part in.

    Games included Bow and Arrows (with soft tips of course) and Jousting on hay bails. All the kids had a great time, and I even saw many adults give a little whirl at hitting the rubber chicken with an arrow. I hate to say it, but some of the youth did much better. <img src=” title=”Smile” />




    Unfortunately there 1ye23l3h]WERE 1ye23l3h]some misses……of the entire barn that is, but that didn’t seem to be a problem as Scouter Kevin quickly rigged up an "Arrow Retrieving Tool", which consisted of a small board with rope tied to it. The first rope was a little small, so Scouter Kevin fashioned another longer rope to the smaller one using one of the knots we teach you here at Stittsville Scouts. 1ye23l3h]Up she went, knot came undone, board and short rope now on top of barn as well1ye23l3h]…….time to make an "Arrow Retriever…Retrieve Tool", to retrieve the first Arrow Retriever that was designed to get the arrows….that we needed to retrieve…whew! :oops: (Sorry Kevin, couldn’t resist)

    Also in full showing at the Villagefest activities was some local talent and some great slides for the kids. The performers were great and the full size blow up slides were amazing.




    During these activities, at around 11:00 the Parade came down the road with an abundance of floats, bands, and vehicles. It was a great showing. Stittsville Residents flooded the streets in anticipation for the upcoming parade.

    For those who were busy working or couldn’t make the day, I’ve included a few photos here, so you too can get a feeling of the parade, as if you were there yourself.

    I hope you enjoy and and if you couldn’t make it this year, make sure you get out there next year, support the food bank, see the local talent, and participate in the fun and food at the Abbot Street Park.

    1ye23l3h][size=150:1ye23l3h]The Virtual Parade…….[/size:1ye23l3h]1ye23l3h]














    [size=150:1ye23l3h]Click here if you’d like to see a SLIDESHOW of these photos….[/size:1ye23l3h]

    in reply to: Ladder Lashing Knot #1997

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    1kmpe94i]START:1kmpe94i] The ladder lashing is started by using a clove hitch stopped with two half hitches to secure a rope to the top end of each rail.

    1kmpe94i]STEP 1:1kmpe94i] Lay an overhand loop over each side rail so that the running end of each loop is to the outside.

    1kmpe94i]STEP 2:1kmpe94i] Place a rung across the rails so that the standing part of each overhand loop is over the end of the rung and the running part of each overhand loop is under the rung.

    1kmpe94i]STEP 3:1kmpe94i] Pull the running part side of each overhand loop behind and to the outside of each rail.

    1kmpe94i]STEP 4:1kmpe94i] Then pull the loop over the end of the rung.

    in reply to: Turkish Woggle Knot #1996

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    [size=150:1jno3szp]1jno3szp]Turkish Woggle Knot 1jno3szp] [/size:1jno3szp]

    1jno3szp]How to make a 5 Bight 4 Lead Turkish Knot1jno3szp]

    STEP 1: Cut a length of string, 1/8 diameter poly string. A 5 bight, 4 lead two strand knot will need 2ft, whereas a three strand knot will require 3ft. Burn each end to seal the string as this will make it easier to weave the string make the knot.

    Hold string with one end under thumb and wrap string behind finger (this is called the working end of string).
    [img:1jno3szp]http://stittsvillescouts.powweb.com/images/turkishknot/1.JPG[/img:1jno3szp]

    Wrap working end back up and over to the left, and bring down behind fingers.
    [img:1jno3szp]http://stittsvillescouts.powweb.com/images/turkishknot/2.JPG[/img:1jno3szp]

    Bring working end up and over to the right and then tuck under middle string.
    [img:1jno3szp]http://stittsvillescouts.powweb.com/images/turkishknot/3.JPG[/img:1jno3szp]

    Turn hand over and pull working end to left.
    [img:1jno3szp]http://stittsvillescouts.powweb.com/images/turkishknot/4.JPG[/img:1jno3szp]

    KEY STEP. Ignore working end of string. Take left string and pull over the right string.
    [img:1jno3szp]http://stittsvillescouts.powweb.com/images/turkishknot/5.JPG[/img:1jno3szp]

    KEY STEP: bring working end of string UNDER the first string and the OVER the right string.
    [img:1jno3szp]http://stittsvillescouts.powweb.com/images/turkishknot/6.JPG[/img:1jno3szp]

    KEY STEP: bring working back and UNDER the right string.
    [img:1jno3szp]http://stittsvillescouts.powweb.com/images/turkishknot/7.JPG[/img:1jno3szp]

    Pull working end to tighten up string. Make sure that the working falls between the two string.
    [img:1jno3szp]http://stittsvillescouts.powweb.com/images/turkishknot/8.JPG[/img:1jno3szp]

    Turn hand over – your knot should look like this.
    [img:1jno3szp]http://stittsvillescouts.powweb.com/images/turkishknot/9.JPG[/img:1jno3szp]

    Bring working end up and to the left and then UNDER the left string and OVER the right string.
    [img:1jno3szp]http://stittsvillescouts.powweb.com/images/turkishknot/10.JPG[/img:1jno3szp]

    1jno3szp]THIS NOW COMPLETES YOUR FIRST HALF OF YOUR TURKISH KNOT.1jno3szp] Note that when you tuck the working end OVER the right string, the working end now follows the original path of the knot.

    STEP 2: REMOVE KNOT FROM FINGERS – EITHER PUT KNOT AROUND A DOWEL OR HOLD THE KNOT BY HAND

    Remove knot from fingers – work leading edge of string along 1st path of original string (path leads down).
    [img:1jno3szp]http://stittsvillescouts.powweb.com/images/turkishknot/11.JPG[/img:1jno3szp]

    Work Leading end upwards to follow the path of the original string and pull string together.
    [img:1jno3szp]http://stittsvillescouts.powweb.com/images/turkishknot/12.JPG[/img:1jno3szp]+++++[img:1jno3szp]http://stittsvillescouts.powweb.com/images/turkishknot/13.JPG[/img:1jno3szp]

    Work leading edge of string down and follow original path of string.
    [img:1jno3szp]http://stittsvillescouts.powweb.com/images/turkishknot/14.JPG[/img:1jno3szp]

    Work Leading end upwards to follow the path of the original string.
    [img:1jno3szp]http://stittsvillescouts.powweb.com/images/turkishknot/15.JPG[/img:1jno3szp]

    Continue to work leading end of string along original path.
    [img:1jno3szp]http://stittsvillescouts.powweb.com/images/turkishknot/16.JPG[/img:1jno3szp]+++++[img:1jno3szp]http://stittsvillescouts.powweb.com/images/turkishknot/17.JPG[/img:1jno3szp]+++++[img:1jno3szp]http://stittsvillescouts.powweb.com/images/turkishknot/18.JPG[/img:1jno3szp]

    Knot is almost complete – continue to work leading end around till you have completed the second strand.
    [img:1jno3szp]http://stittsvillescouts.powweb.com/images/turkishknot/19.JPG[/img:1jno3szp]+++++[img:1jno3szp]http://stittsvillescouts.powweb.com/images/turkishknot/20.JPG[/img:1jno3szp]

    Knot is now complete. You can end the knot, or continue to make a three strand knot by continuing to weave the working along the path of the string until complete.
    [img:1jno3szp]http://stittsvillescouts.powweb.com/images/turkishknot/21.JPG[/img:1jno3szp]

    Now that you are finished, your knot is probably quite loose and larger than you desire. To tighten the knot, place over a 3/4 Inch dowel and then pull the string tight. This will require that you pull the string around the knot and you will have surplus string left over.
    [img:1jno3szp]http://stittsvillescouts.powweb.com/images/turkishknot/22.JPG[/img:1jno3szp]

    When you are finished, clip both ends of the string and burn them to seal the ends. You may tuck the ends into the inside of the knot, or do as I prefer, and soak the knot in White non-toxic school glue. Smear white glue on the inside and outside of the knot and leave to dry overnight. Once dry, the knot is very strong and has good resistance to stain and wear and tear.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 42 total)